Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN 14
MSNBCW 14
CSPAN2 12
FBC 8
CNBC 6
CNNW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
SFGTV 2
LANGUAGE
English 71
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
that. by your gifts online, paying tax, others don't, supreme court doesn't want to get in the middle of it. judge andrew napolitano has no problem getting in the middle of that. and then, consolidating your wallet into just one card. the high-tech idea could be the way we shop in the future. it is all coming up along with dagen mcdowell on "markets now." dagen: giddyup. changing out of the shirt you had done earlier and now you look more businesslike. connell: i will take that as a complement on both sides. i have no other choice but to check the market and talk to the judge. dagen: we have to hit your slender. we have gains on the market right now despite the better-than-expected numbers from adp, nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. nicole: you mentioned adp, which was better. we also got new hom home sales numbers better than expected, we are seeing the market with three straight days of selling and they might have scooped up some opportunity. right now dow jones industrial of 41 points, a gain of one quarter of 1%. microsoft hitting new highs, goldman sachs and unite
research. kil, cities across the country saw declining sales takes revenues, declining tax ref news as people's homes reduced in valley. value. >> a lot of cities are experiencing fiscal stress but i want to reiterate bankruptcies are rare. those who issue debt in the credit market only 10 a year going "g" into bankruptcy. while fiscal stress is a chief concern, bankruptcy is still a very rare phenomenon. >> is it stuffer at a time when the economy is not robust when the state's in which these cities and counties are located are also feeling a lot of strain, is it tough for put these restructuring deals together? >> the state plays a significant role in the fiscal health of the city. they offer state aid to local governments. that makes up a third of the city revenues. when cities cut back due to their own fiscal pressures local governments experience a lot of fiscal squeeze as well. >> are there fewer good choices when you're finally pushed to make a bankruptcy declaration. >> bankruptcy is a measure of last resort. joining anybody enjoys having to papaying pensioners, or putting c
, more spending, and more taxing. that is what would drive up interest rates, that is what would hit the cost of living and that is what every family in this country should dread. >> order. >> you're been watching prime minister's questions. question time cares on c-span2 every wednesday. again on sunday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. you can watch anytime at c- span.org. on the next washington journal, what to expect from healthcare.gov afternoon fixes. scott wilson joins us. health careon state exchanges and online enrollment compared to the federal exchange. in recognition of the 150th anniversary, a discussion about the law and dealing with whistleblowers and its effectiveness. plus, your calls, e-mails and tweets on "washington journal" on c-span. social media is an old idea. we think it is recent and only people alive today have done it. there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the late roman republic. that is first century bc in the point is you do not need a digital network to do social media. you could actually do it in your own face. c
's pension benefits an cut those benefits, adopted a multimillion dollar tax cut for multinational corporation within that state. so the state is not impoverished. the state is choosing priorities that are different than the citizens have chosen by adopting a constitutional protection of pension benefits. >> woodruff: andrew biggs what about that, and what about the bigger picture here, that the blame, that if there is going to be pain, the pain should be spread, that it shouldn't be mainly or even in large part these people who have worked so hard for these cities. >> uh-huh. i suspect in the case of detroit, it's not going to be mainly or in large part on the pensioners, it going to be mostly on the bondholders who are going to get hit much more. i mean steve is right when he cites the average benefits people receive from pensions. that includes a lot of people who spent a few years in public employment and are getting very small benefits. if you are somebody who spent a full career working for the city of detroit, you would retire with a benefit equal of around two-thirds your f
which is trying to make a big stink about this suggesting that they wouldn't, for example, allow tax cuts or other types of things for certain companies and not others, right? this is whether we should have tax cuts. >> this happens all the time. totally incestuous between public and private constantly. look at places like illinois now where any company that stays is getting some kind of a deal except probably the small ones. >> except the small ones. any company of any size is getting a deal. >> maybe the rolls should be across the board nothing? >> no. >> a friend of mine, joannea kagan. >> didn't bob kraft do it in foxborough? >> i don't know enough. >>> let's talk about the next story. if you work on wall street and are considering growing a beard, an article in "the new york times" says that while beards are in fashion right now, that is not the case in the finance industry. i guess it's okay in fashion, it's okay in design. a lot of different areas if you're a helpster but in the fashion world, gentleman, the argument goes it looks like you have something to hide. >> you could
provide health insurance or pay taxes. this and other subsequently announced the delays do not enforce at all. on the contrary they are merely phasing in the adjustments designed to ensure effective implementation of the statute in accordance with congress purposes. the treasury department announcement makes that clear in the proposed regulations that it has followed through on on september 5 to make that clear as does the treasury statement that it intends to continue fine-tuning those regulations and working with the people affected by them until you become finally effective. and i should emphasize just after the administration took this action, president george w. bush secretary concord the obama administration to delay the mandate was wise. that was based on his experience in phasing in the medicare part d. prescription drug benefit. i have to say hyperventilating about an extraordinary and unprecedented constitutional these delays are is just that. it's contrary to the obvious historical fact. nor is the delay of the employer mandate on the front of the constitution. the framers c
to qualify. you can get tax-free money from the equity in your home. you can use the money to pay off your current mortgage if you have one. the remaining money can be used for anything. there's no monthly mortgage payments. and you still own your home! call today to get your free guide and dvd. it explains how a government-insured reverse mortgage works. there's no obligation. one reverse mortgage is a quicken loans company. their licensed experts can answer all your questions. call to find out what a great solution this can be. don't wait, call now! >>> today the administration is fending off a new wave of republican and conservative legal challenges. two states are claiming the irs does not have the power to give tax credits or subsidies to people who buy insurance through the federal health exchange. that is a long shot, although it is one in a series of suits across the country that target the affordable care act. i want to bring in oklahoma congressman james lankford and number five republican in the house. good to see you, congressman, good morning. >> good to see you as well. >> we
. >> it truly is. >> which is why taxes become an issue. we'll talk about that later in the show. indra petersons loves taxes. >> shopping to taxes, you just took me from here to there. >> she used to work with the irs before getting into weather. >> i'm not listening. just painful right now. let's talk about what's going on in the southeast. still talking about a wave of energy, cloudy, light showers. not a big deal into the southeast. temperatures look at this, they're amazing. we're still talking about temperatures into the 70s through atlanta, especially by tomorrow in through boston, temperatures right where they should, maybe a hint above normal. all of this is going to be changing thanks to a system out west. talk about snow. yes, we're talking about anywhere from wisconsin back through colorado. look at all these winter weather advisories. we know there is a change in store for us out on the east. of course as the system finally makes its way east. for today, 1 to 2 feet of snow, extending farther in through colorado and minnesota. we'll be looking at that as well. you can see t
, not just a job. >> reporter: and allem, there are no new tax hikes or spending cuts on the horizon as a part of these budget battles. no major ones at least. so economists say that will also bodes well for the recovery. alex. >> kristin it, quick question about the president's schedule next hour. what is this, a saban forum he's going to be attending that and speaking? >> that's right. that is sponsored by the brookings institution. he's going to be speakinging there a forum on middle east policy. white house officials say it's up to the moderators to set the tone. i can tell you that the title of the forum this afternoon, alex, is power shifts, u.s.-israeli relations in dynamic middle east. the backdrop to this forum, the recent deal struck with iran to freeze iran's nuclear programs for six months in exchange for scaling back some of the sanctions, israel didn't like the deal. as you know, that created fresh tensions between the united states and israel. no guarantee that that will be discussed during the forum, but certainly one of the big issues in the backdrop. then of course,
of child pornography. the lock in some instances require you to file an income tax return. mr. lazarus, is the chief executive constitution capable of ignoring both categories of long? >> well, as i said several times, congressman gowdy, the president cannot refuse to apply or enforce the law for policy reasons. >> well, let's analyze that for a second. congress decided in its collective wisdom that if you possess xml at a controlled stuff as you're going to get x. amount of time in prison. you may like mandatoriness. you may not like them. this administration summarily dispensed with that law. so my question to you again is can the chief executive failed to enforce categories of laws that are both permissive and mandatory. >> it is well-established that the executive branch has prosecutorial discretion. that's a decline in force spendt what are those limits of? >> very frankly, i'm not an expert on that. >> let me ask you this. can the president -- lets us in a statute required you to show two pieces of identification to purchase a farm. can the chief executive knock that down to one?
, but also talking about new fees to raise revenue instead of tax hikes. from what you're hearing this general framework, could you support it? >> well, it depends. the trillion dollars you're talking about is higher than what the existing law is and i would point out that speaking of existing law, we have one that specifies the level of discretionary spending. specifies that at $967 billion. so from my point of view if we're going to spend more than that, then we ought to find offsetting savings some where else, which i'm very much open to. i know our friends on the other side of the aisle want there to be revenue. we're not going to support tax increases. are there some categories of revenue that are of a different nature? >> such as? >> for instance, federal employees have very generous retirement plans. if we asked them to contribute a little bit more to their retirement plan, that gets scored as revenue but i think it's legitimate to see that as savings so it really depends on the composition of the package. >> do you think there will be a deal by the end of the year? >> i th
should not be fooled by that. ashley: commuting get as little more taxing. the amount of workers can put transit costs cut in half by congress. at least those with the train. that is outrage. tracy: because they have drive evers? in tech minute we'll review lg's curved glass phone which is about to hit the store shelves. ashley: the dow has been down over 100 points for a long time but as you can see, desperately trying to make a comeback, down 99 points or there abouts. the market has been under a little bit of selling pressure these last several days. get breaking news on the fed beige book. peter baron's with the details. peteer? >> hey, ashley and tracy, the beige book for november says the economy continued to expand ad a modest to moderate pace from mid-october through mid insofar as november and the report does not appear to tee up tapering of bond purchases cuttings back on quantitative easing in next two weeks when the report will be used by policymakers. this reports e has the same language on the economy and job creation as the last meetings on beige book in october when the f
are expected to pay 10% of their after-tax income for health insurance policy that might have a $2,000 deduct illinois and some states the deductible is up to $6,000. these people are the healthy, invincibles and not a lot of people have disposable income no matter they're age to to have to put 10% of your disposable income out for something that is a piece of paper with a big deductible, is an uphill battle to convince these people to purchase. >> bottom line, the site is up and running and getting better and more people log on. apparently they're doing so but don't like what they see and log off. >> well, yeah. again, i think what you're going to see here is the president and the administration generally are going to have a campaign unlike we saw in 2008, unlike we saw in 2012, to save obamacare and they'll be pushing hard to get the young invincibles signed up. they want to sign sign 7 million people up by march 31. they won't have a million and a half people by december 1, which is a big deadline. you have to believe people who want insurance, who value insurance, have preexisting conditi
their claim that the statute authorizes tax credit through exchanges of established by the federal government under section 1321 or that it was congresses intent for the statute to authorize tax credit through those exchanges. so there's a lot more to be said about all of this. if i make would like to respond to some of -- >> let me cut you off at this point. i only have all bit of time. mr. turley, you mentioned something along the lines of your concern that president obama is becoming the very danger, separation of powers was meant to prevent. and mr. lazarus mentioned earlier that, i don't know exactly who he's referring to, but some are hyperventilating about this whole topic. would you want to comment on both of those things, either in relation to each other or not? >> mr. lazarus maybe responding to my labor breathing with the flu, but if not, my testimony -- the reason i think there's this disconnect in our view, is we obviously read history differently. i view the constitutional convention is quite clear. the framers were students of history, james madison. 150 years before they took
about it. >> check with your tax accountant, because some stocks cannot really go into i.r.a.s because of a business tax. you want to be sure. you've got to talk with your accountant about these. the stock had a not great quarter and it's been knocked down. and the master limited partnerships have all been coming down. but i believe in rich kinder. rich kinder is not dick heckman. dick heckmann had a terrific company around, this one's not it. rich kinder made a lot of people a lot of money. i'm not going to abandon that company. but i do honestly right now like linn energy more. higher rates don't have to be the end of the world, conn's might be a microcosm. wouldn't you like to have a stock that goes up gigantically? or would you say i don't want that gain because rates are going higher? stay with cramer. >>> coming up -- nice view? hilton's more than $2 billion ipo is about to hit the street. are there better accommodations for your cash, or should you try and book a room in this newly minted stock? >>> you know that this has been a downright incredible year for initial public offer
. >> even though i was a texan and energy paid 55 or 60% of the taxes that were paid in texas, we felt that it was a very important and we breathe life into the epa by giving them a role in that act. i'm kind of sorry now that we did because they acted well and we were pleased with what they did and we thought that even though they were energy oriented, that the energy people needed some supervision. but they also needed some help for the federal government couldn't give, so they her despite overregulation and that's what i was asking about i guess. chairwoman, the key goal in the ferc strategic plan, 2009 to 2014 g-golf are the safe, reliable and efficient infrastructure development to integrate the new resources. are you supportive of ferc -- you've been there for three weeks, you said? >> i've been at this job for two weeks. >> you have done it very well. thank you for the answers you've given. are you supportive of ferc blank bill included in this plan? >> yes, i am. it's important -- >> what changes would you consider on this bill? do you have any changes that you would make? .. w
that affect all online shoppers. sales taxes and why you should be paying it. states lose $2 billion a year from uncollected tax from web users. the supreme court decided yesterday not to get involved in appeals from amazon.com and overstock.com. the court let ruling from internet retailers to collect sales taxes even if they have no physical presence in the state. do you follow me? the issue effectively ends tax-free online shopping for lots of people. brick and mortar people say they are at a disadvantage when they have to collect taxes and online do not. it's different from state-to-state and it's just been a real mess there but supreme court is not going to weigh in on this. i want to give you a quick peek at the markets. dow and the major markets all fell after the black friday results showed that consumers spent less than last year. gold stock fell as well. concerns about the fed withdrawing -- using a big pull-back in gold this year. the ten-year treasury climbed again. it means higher mortgage rates likely and higher rates for car loans and the like. krispy kreme had a very bad day.
names. >> stocks up, too. you're not going to have that big tax loss fear. a lot of people saying i can find inexpensive tech, i don't need to go into the cloud. although apple is saying this is about ibm being wrong and apple being right. >> there has been an expectation of a china mobile deal. >> yes. >> unbeknownst to most people who hold the stock. that being said, 740 million china mobile subscribers, there is a fairly large audience they could conceivably be addressing to try to buy smartphones. >> do you remember the conference call that was the open rebellion against tim cook? it was withone of these things e i thought it was 1948 where stillwell had just lost china and now he's making a move. he did not lose china. >> we'll see. that fortune story has a lot of people talking about whether china mobile makes a big move in this direction, having not carried their phones till now. >> maybe samsung -- don't hear a lot about samsung having a revolutionary new phone. >> no, although they've got a lot of new patents, they're going to do the curve thing or fold thing. >> maybe they hav
by some now is not the time to raise taxes, yet the house budget cannot produce spending bills from the appropriations committee that can actually pass on the house floor. in some cases, they appear to not even be able to pass from subcommittee. all the while we're looking at a sea of unmet needs and face a floundering economy. there is one area that can help break the logjam, not solve all our problems, certainly, but help us significantly along the way. congress should address the critical needs of our nation's infrastructure deficit. roads, bridges, transit systems are all increasingly at risk. we are facing an inadequate state of repair, construction of new facilities are on hold and we are losing ground in meeting our own needs, let alone the challenges of global competition. yet, this challenge is an opportunity for some potential progress. we know what to do to meet this challenge. we can write a new transportation bill that will meet today's needs. it just needs more money. there is a vast coalition that supports additional resources for infrastructure. the so-called special
was on the ways and means committee, we drafted a bill to cut off all tax benefits to united states firms doing business in south africa. which meant that in addition to paying taxes to them, they had to pay taxes to the united states. and that meant that most all of them immediately left there. so i had no idea that president mandela or at that time when he was released from jail before i went back for the campaign. and someone was telling him about the rangel amendment, and he said no, not the rangel amendment. i said i'm going to be embarrassed. he said no, in south africa it's known as the bloody rangel amendment to the whites. his sense of humor on serious issues is equality that quite frankly and i've given it a lot of thought before i've said that that i've never seen or heard that anyone would ever have. >> congressman charlie rangel, always good to have you on the program. but thank you so much for coming in on this day in particular. it's good to see you. >> thank you, chris. >> we will return to our coverage of nelson mandela's life after the break. south africans have been singing a
. >> any plans to do anything to step up the collection of property taxes to bring in more revenue to the city? >> property taxes are being collected as we speak. i think it's a misnomer, because some of the numbers that i see are numbers that go back to 2009 when i first came into office where it was said there's 100 to $150 million of uncollected taxes. you go back 10 years ago using the same numbers, it's not realistic. number one, a lot of those people are businesses that are no longer here. we need the number as it relates to taxes. the same thing holds true for empty houses. i see the number constantly at 78,000. that's not a right number. it's a moving number on a monthly basis but it's not near to 78,000. >> when you say -- >> that was detroit mayor dave bing speaking on the ruling moments ago that detroit can file chapter 9 bankruptcy. he'll be joining us later this hour. but first "twelve days of christmas" and
.looking at tax they are also not looking at significant cuts to medicare, security,or social which are areas republicans say needs to be done. instead we are looking at pretty small things and haggling over whether to have federal employees attribute more to their retirement -- employees contribute more to their retirement plans. thingse also looking at -- a spectrum that is going to be sold to telephone companies. they are looking at a small budget deal that would replace some of the sequester, the automatic spending cuts that were launched in 2011 as part of a but -- part of a different budget process. like can't there right now? why can't there be a grand bargain right now? caller: because republicans and democrats can't agree. all ryan, the chairman of the budget committee, and patty murray decided they were not going to go after the towels of the other party and just try to get something that was possible -- after all these failed budget agreements in the past, look we are not even going to go there this time. we are going to go for something much smaller. host: talking with ian swanson
. >> they have to cut some deals. sears was a big -- >> right. but the tax revenues, whatever you get there, you're probably losing it as people leave unless you do something this. don't get me started. >> well, the governor said even though the senate passed it, the house -- >> they didn't have an auto industry or a bailout in illinois. that's purely just mismanagement of the whole pension situation. >> but it's failing to put the money in they've promised he year. there's a lot of states that promise these things and -- is. >> the whole detroit thing we'll talk about. it's a tough one because on the nightly news you'll see every retiree. they'll say, if a dollar is cut out of my pension -- >> and by the way, tier not making massive pensions. >> i know that. but right now, there's no city services. >> and detroit is a unique situation because you have seen a loss of the people living there. you can no longer support the infrastructure that was there for 1.5 million people when you see the numbers decline. >> and the journal has a piece and it sounds cold and heartless, but if public unions are
prominent, taxes were slashed for the wealthiest, while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. and for a certain period of time, we could ignore this weakening economic foundation, in part because more families were relying on two earners as women entered the workforce. we took on more debt financed by a juiced-up housing market. but when the music stopped, and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. and the result is an economy that's become profoundly unequal, and families that are more insecure. i'll just give you a few statistics. since 1979, when i graduated from high school, our productivity is up by more than 90%, but the income of the typical family has increased by less than 8%. since 1979, our economy has more than doubled in size, but most of that growth has flowed to a fortunate few. the top 10% no longer takes in one-third of our income -- it now takes half. whereas in the past, the average ceo made about 20 to 30 times the income of the average worker, today's ceo now
work, but it might. say you had a 4-5 percent national sales tax on all goods and services and you use this money totally to pay for medicaid. now medicare is taken care of it. so you would cap all of the people not on medicaid and medicare. you would cap the rates that insurance companies could ask of them and lower the price for all of the people that are inbetweens. i wondered what you thought of that idea. >> kathy, why do you think that is a good idea? >> because i think it it would be a fair way, and it would bring the rates down, and it would be people could make the choice if they didn't want to pay a national sales tax and if they didn't want to they would not by the skis or the new dress or whatever. and it would just -- i think it would lower the rate of people between medicare/medicaid. >> thank you very much. let's see what congresswoman thinks about that idea. >> thank you. well, kathy, i really feel like the affordable care act was important because it focused beyond just medicare/medicaid. medicaid was expanded in the states where you have governors and legislative memb
would have to work 75 hours a week to have the after-tax income that this company thought was basic to a family budget, 75 hours a week. low wages aren't a problem just in the fast food industry. i don't want to just pick on wal-mart and mcdonald's. it's catching up in many other traditional jobs that used to be able to support a family. there may be fewer, better examples of this than in the banking sector. the banking industry in america last year posted $141.3 billion in profits. the median executive pay in the banking industry in america is $552,000 a year. and yet, a recent report found that 39% of bank tellers in the state of new york are on public assistance. low-wage worker is just not enough to get by. working 40 hours a week at 7.25 translates into $15,080 a year. that's about $400 less than the federal poverty level guidelines for a family of two. if you accept the sample budget that we've talked about, a worker making the minimum wage would have to work 75 hours a week to have the after-tax income necessary to make ends meet. working 75 hours a week at a minimum wage wit
. >> are you going to push for a decline? sales to encome tax and then have a bank where you have a bank and put in $3 trillion, $4 trillion? you know can you do that if you push for it. >> i wouldn't doing repatriation holiday. i'd reform our tax code, bring the down, wut the loopholes whuch do that, you get some transition revenue. you can put that in a grand barg en kb. >> wool see youneck month. >> good morning, everybody. happy friday. what a rally we've got going here. whatever happened to fierce of tapering? we got cyclical groups, the telecomes, health care, defensive groups. we're up right across the board, folks. it's been a very strong rally right at the open but not strong inform a mr. one guy said it threads the needle perfectly. people putting together a list of what the skmik news looks like this week. here's a look for the bulls, gdp numbers very strong overall. auto sales, over 16 million, the highest in six years here. october home sales were the highest since june 2008. highest in manufacturing, highest in two and a half years and cyber sales were up 20% on monday. >>
different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyber space. now, the challenge is first of all we do have people who are trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terrorist attack in this country, a weapon of mass destruction getting onto the new york subway system, et cetera, we do want to keep eyes on some bad actors. the second thing is that the same cyb
and run its own schools with its own tax revenue. >> a new city for you guys, this is strictly about education? it's 100% totally about education. we didn't come into this saying we want to create the 5th largest city in louisiana, we came into this saying we want to take accountability for the schools in our area. >> but critics say st. george would take more than just accountability. a report commissioned by the baton rouge area chamber warns the break up would cost the city at large 53 million dollars, 20% of its budget. and it would futher segregate the city. baton rouge is already majority black, st. george would be a majority white by a 3 to 1 ratio. >> so now we would have white kids going to school over here on this end of the parish, white kids going to school over there on the other end of the parish, and in the middle, we'd have just the black kids going to school. >> there's also a major income disparity. residents in baton rouge make an average of 58 thousand dollars a year. in the much more affluent st. george area, the average income is 90 thousand. >> i think we have
are expecting health care costs to rise another new tax that will calm on consumers. there are a lot of things that have hit the economy, concerns about the government shutdown, concerns about his health care plan, that has translated into not a lot of new jobs. a lot of the numbers have been disappointing and people see that. for people that are working and haven't lost their jobs, they probably feel confident that they can go out and spend some money for the christmas season. but no one is feeling gregarious because there is a lot of uncertainty about the economy and at the same time, we have a 7% consumer savings rate and that is all the way down to 2% now. what we are seeing is consumers have chipped away at any savings they have had and have very few bullets left in the chamber here neil: all right, thank you, have a great holiday. >> u.s. well. neil: here is what might be holding us back, looking at health care premiums. retail cyber monday come or you can point and click and find deals and health care cyber monday where you can't necessarily find this. kate joins us now. >> millions of
decline. the gas tax has not been increased since the clinton administration 20 years ago. the future prospects are even worse. demands are increasing and deferred maintenance takes its toll while we watch the bottom fall out of the highway trust fund. we've seen a slowdown in revenue due to the near collapse of the economy, a shift in driving patterns while people, especially young people, drive less and improved fuel efficiency. it's scheduled to improve -- further reduce gascon sumpings dramatically with -- reduce gas consumption dramatically with plug in hybrid vehicles. it's time for congress to act. we've seen our partners at the state level increase transportation level in 13 states, but they need congress to act to maintain that partnership. there's a large coalition that stands ready to support congress. the u.s. chamber, the national afl-cio, building trades, trucking industry, numerous associations of small and medium-sized businesses, local chambers of commerce, local government, professional organizations, bicyclists,. the coalition is broad and persuasive, requesting con
of this is that we are very dependent on property taxes so beyond the education cost-sharing dollars that the state distributes everything else is basically tied to local property taxes. those bases aren't growing anymore so p. shuler -- people are forced to work together and i think the folks that will leave this discussion are actually in the communities right now looking at how do you continue to support education when your list is not growing. it will drive innovation. >> as far as funding for education over say the next five years doesn't look like it's going to be flat or will it be down or will it be a? >> i think it's a little early to tell. this is the slowest recovery from a recession in the post world war ii era and i am visiting you here in washington but the folks in washington seem to put the brakes on the economy every six months or so. or even more often than not. they are not helping and with first act to growth in the economy. i think that americans will put more money into education and the economy is doing better or when they confront the fact that the funding education is actua
, you must implement. near to date has been through a tax cap. a lot of other budget cuts. the things that teachers actually need to do, work together, use the standard as a guideline on a straitjacket, have curriculum, method not happen. in a couple places it did, in a lot of places it did not. the big mistake that both the federal government made and other people, -- king would say to you, i was sick and tired of telling people what to do and then not doing it. that is not your job to tell people what to do. your job is to help navigate people through this again actual ship. consequently, lester new york, there were in elementary schools these tests. a lot of people were not prepared. john king in and meryl tisch said the test results would be 30% less net's year than this year. the question is, how did they actually know the exact number? it creates teachers draft. you can actually figure out what the cut scores were and how to align it. between the lack of preparation for teachers, the lack of communication with parents, and the sense that you are using the data, using the kids' d
for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. and if we're going to do a good job preventing terrorist attack in this country, a weapon of mass destruction, getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera, we do want to keep eyes on some bad actors. the second thing is that the same cyberspace that gives u
... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> michael eaves is here with sports. kind of a shake up in coaching ranks in one nba team. >> not one you would expect at this point in the season. >> the expectations were high because as a player kid was considered to have the highest basketballisbasketball iq in the nets made a change to the coaching staff today. >> it's lawrence frank who has been reassigned to a role where he will no longer attend practices or games there was reports that there was growing tension between frank and kidd. they called the move a result
and no new tax dollars that will be allocated to make your project happen. and i guess, you know, number three, you have to embrace, the process, that is san francisco. what you saw today we are proud of and because the engineers and doing difficult things, the last time that we presented it was the smallest arena in the nba, it took an incredible amount of work to make that smaller to craoe act to the info that we had. >> and it turned into something, that becomes a place for everyone in the bay area, to enjoy, and now, i understand that we understand the impact, on the neighborhoods. and but it is not the water front is not only for the neighborhoods to enjoy, we have to be responsible, and i think that we are being responsible in terms of pursuing a transportation plan with the city, that addresses very legitimate concerns and we are at the top of the list of those who have those concerns and we are the entity putting one billion dollars into this project and it needs to work and people need to get there and people need to enjoy the percent of getting there and everything that happens
and medicare. they're going to get savings better known as cuts. a that budget also included tax cut that was paid for with an asterisk, meaning the ways and means committee and appropriations committee would have to figure out how to fill the $5.7 trillion hole. arithmetic requires you to recognize you can only fill the hole by either raising taxes or additional cuts. now we know that republicans are opposed to tax increases and the only real big ticket item left that could come anywhere close to filling that hole would be social security and medicare. the only thing on the table left to pay for that the c.b.c. budget does not include an ast risk or other budget gimmicks. our budget outlines a concrete plan that makes tough choices and presents credible options to achieve our budget reduction targets. the c.b.c. budget calls for revenue enhancements totaling $2.7 trillion over the next decade. our budget outline house the house ways and means committee and the senate finance committee can reach this number by highlighting several revenue options totaling $4.2 trillion that could be
side. you can reform the tax system and blame what you don't like on the other side. but i prefer doing things and blame it on the other side. thank you. >>> up next, the latest from republicans. president obama is anti-catholic, they say. never stops. this has to do with real estate, by the way. not religion. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> democrats are fighting back against another round of strict new voting restrictions. this time in ohio. u.s. congresswoman marsha fudge says the effort to cut down on early voting days and same-day registration to make voters show photo i.d.s is to suppress votes of african-americans and other minorities. we've seen it in state after state, in 36 states in all just this year. where republicans want to make it harder for minorities, students, and elderly people to vote especially in cities where people tend to be democrats. make it harder to cast ballots. simple, huh? and we'll be right back. >>> we're back. you can call it obama derangement system. the diplomatic edition. first the state department decided to move its embassy to the
the great benefits of this law. jon: that is how i feel every year when i compile my taxes. i've spent so much of my life dedicating time to satisfy a government requirement. >> that is right. there are continuing problems with it, there will be back in problems getting to the insurer. and we have some evidence with the original expectation, everyday people that sign up for private insurance for coverage under the affordable care act, seven out of eight would get a subsidy. what we have is the evidence through the middle of november and is compiled by "the wall street journal", it would indicate that those who signed up for private insurance in the state exchanges, 23% got a subsidy. and those that signed up from the federal exchange got less than 30% of a subsidy. the vast majority of people are going on and finding that their deductibles or higher, premiums are higher, putting more out of their own pocket to get the health care they are talking about. soon all of that information that is getting dumped into your health care dog. we will be talking about this. "the new york times" is spe
of outstanding issues. we talked about unemployment insurance. we got over 50 tax extenders that will expire this year. they're important to number of important industries and costs to the economy. >> one of the big issues you talked about, extending those emergency unemployment insurance benefits. democrats are arguing about that on the house floor. republicans say these are emergency measures. democrats say that, look, economy is still in trouble. we still need to extend the emergency unemployment benefits. on january 1st, the maximum unenemployment benefit goes from 73 weeks, to a maximum of 26 weeks. house speaker john boehner says president obama has proposal to extend those benefits. back to you. adam: rich edson, thank you very much. >> factory workers and labor organizers. raising, to raise a federal minimum wage. >> few moments ago the demonstrators lift the scene. look at video. reported just a short time ago. at one point, things got very tense. some demonstrators tried to force their way into the restaurant. restaurant hired a security guard. and apparent the demonstrators decide
, but taxes more and has a lot more power over individual americans. lou: just within the last two days the president also again sounding like a tea party chieftain as he railed against the inequities of the income distribution in the country, the heartless disparate distribution of wealth across, as if he had not been president for five years. >> his entire goal the whole time is to literally take from the rich and give to the board. this is what he campaigned on. you're sitting here talking about the expansion of government committee introduced obamacare as chief legislation. literally almost double the size of government. when it enacted completely. once again, it is just what is coming of his mouth. he is on the campaign trail. american people bought it up until now. his approval ratings are abysmal >> the speech about inequality was not at tea party speech. it was in occupy wall street speech. a call for socialism, take money away from the rich and give it to the port. the best example of why this is not that tea party president, think about obamacare coming into effect. one of the
the one that best represents you. we take a look at tax rates. it is congress that appears to allow a certain batch of temporary tax breaks to last at the end of 2013. ray from oklahoma city oklahoma, you are up next. are you there? good morning, you are on. i was calling about -- our man is going to make mistakes. the problem with the world, it does not have anything to do with obama. we have taken god out of everything he is doing. the next thing, minimum wage. i talked to a lot of people atut minimum wage at 7:25 -- $7.25 an hour. people say if you raise minimum wage, the influence will go up. everything else is already going up except minimum wage. years taken almost four to get it to seven dollars $.25. i am 61 years old, i am retired, and i have four kids. i have kids working for memo wage. they got student loans to pay back. journal"ll street talking about unemployment benefits in several stories, set to expire on september 28. several democrats are pushing for a vote to extend the benefits. house democrats propose renewing the program for $25 billion but have no way to offse
between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >>> michael eaves is here with sports. it kind of feels likely the n.f.l. playoffs have started. >> like the free playos. win the games and get into the post-season carrying the n.f.l.'s best record, the seahawks were looking to secure the nfc west division title and the first round bye. all they had to do was defend the san francisco 49ers. they won last two meetings. the seahawks lost four games to the 9ers. russell wilson would give them a 14 to 9 lead with the only touchdown pass of the game. colin kapernick threw one, an 8 yard to give the 9ers a 16-14 le
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)